arabian botanist
A place to reblog what needs to be reblogged.
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arabian botanist
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kettle-o-fish:

From Ode to Lumpy, Pout Melody (animation by Lilli Carré, sound by Alexander Stewart). Drawn on 20 pieces of paper. The full film with sound can be viewed here.
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eightiesart:

KENJI SAITHO
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rudygodinez:

Prof. Dr, Max Bruckner, Four Plates from the Book “Vielecke und Vielflache”, (1900)
 Regular convex polyhedra, frequently referenced as “Platonic” solids, are featured prominently in the philosophy of Plato, who spoke about them, rather intuitively, in association to the four classical elements (earth, wind, fire, water… plus ether). However, it was Euclid who actually provided a mathematical description of each solid and found the ratio of the diameter of the circumscribed sphere to the length of the edge and argued that there are no further convex polyhedra than those 5: tetrahedron, hexahedron (also known as the cube), octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron.
rudygodinez:

Prof. Dr, Max Bruckner, Four Plates from the Book “Vielecke und Vielflache”, (1900)
 Regular convex polyhedra, frequently referenced as “Platonic” solids, are featured prominently in the philosophy of Plato, who spoke about them, rather intuitively, in association to the four classical elements (earth, wind, fire, water… plus ether). However, it was Euclid who actually provided a mathematical description of each solid and found the ratio of the diameter of the circumscribed sphere to the length of the edge and argued that there are no further convex polyhedra than those 5: tetrahedron, hexahedron (also known as the cube), octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron.
rudygodinez:

Prof. Dr, Max Bruckner, Four Plates from the Book “Vielecke und Vielflache”, (1900)
 Regular convex polyhedra, frequently referenced as “Platonic” solids, are featured prominently in the philosophy of Plato, who spoke about them, rather intuitively, in association to the four classical elements (earth, wind, fire, water… plus ether). However, it was Euclid who actually provided a mathematical description of each solid and found the ratio of the diameter of the circumscribed sphere to the length of the edge and argued that there are no further convex polyhedra than those 5: tetrahedron, hexahedron (also known as the cube), octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron.
rudygodinez:

Prof. Dr, Max Bruckner, Four Plates from the Book “Vielecke und Vielflache”, (1900)
 Regular convex polyhedra, frequently referenced as “Platonic” solids, are featured prominently in the philosophy of Plato, who spoke about them, rather intuitively, in association to the four classical elements (earth, wind, fire, water… plus ether). However, it was Euclid who actually provided a mathematical description of each solid and found the ratio of the diameter of the circumscribed sphere to the length of the edge and argued that there are no further convex polyhedra than those 5: tetrahedron, hexahedron (also known as the cube), octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron.
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fer1972:

Paintings by Afarin Sajedi
fer1972:

Paintings by Afarin Sajedi
fer1972:

Paintings by Afarin Sajedi
fer1972:

Paintings by Afarin Sajedi
fer1972:

Paintings by Afarin Sajedi
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rogerwilkerson:

Hospitality Starts Here - detail from 1948 Coca Cola ad.
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buonfresco:

René Magritte, On the Threshold of Liberty, 1937
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design-is-fine:

Mercedes Benz, advertising for the Transporter or Kastenwagen, 1960s. Source What you’ll need is what we build.
design-is-fine:

Mercedes Benz, advertising for the Transporter or Kastenwagen, 1960s. Source What you’ll need is what we build.
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vicemag:

Mossless in America: Sean Stewart

Brooklyn-based photographer Sean Stewart hails from the industrial city of Pittsburgh, PA. Stewart’s work is quiet and contemplative, and his subject matter is centered around contemporary American issues. His scenes depict everyday normalities: collapsed industry, identical prefabricated houses encroaching on sprawling plains, buses hastily pulling in and out of mall parking lots, and so on. But Stewart’s photographs are particularly arresting because they seem to be detached from the anxious mood these scenes elicit. They’re factual, clean, and seemingly objective, as if he is just hovering above them. We spoke with Sean about objectivity in photography, the decisive moment, and the importance of being part of a photographic community.
Read the interview
vicemag:

Mossless in America: Sean Stewart

Brooklyn-based photographer Sean Stewart hails from the industrial city of Pittsburgh, PA. Stewart’s work is quiet and contemplative, and his subject matter is centered around contemporary American issues. His scenes depict everyday normalities: collapsed industry, identical prefabricated houses encroaching on sprawling plains, buses hastily pulling in and out of mall parking lots, and so on. But Stewart’s photographs are particularly arresting because they seem to be detached from the anxious mood these scenes elicit. They’re factual, clean, and seemingly objective, as if he is just hovering above them. We spoke with Sean about objectivity in photography, the decisive moment, and the importance of being part of a photographic community.
Read the interview
vicemag:

Mossless in America: Sean Stewart

Brooklyn-based photographer Sean Stewart hails from the industrial city of Pittsburgh, PA. Stewart’s work is quiet and contemplative, and his subject matter is centered around contemporary American issues. His scenes depict everyday normalities: collapsed industry, identical prefabricated houses encroaching on sprawling plains, buses hastily pulling in and out of mall parking lots, and so on. But Stewart’s photographs are particularly arresting because they seem to be detached from the anxious mood these scenes elicit. They’re factual, clean, and seemingly objective, as if he is just hovering above them. We spoke with Sean about objectivity in photography, the decisive moment, and the importance of being part of a photographic community.
Read the interview
vicemag:

Mossless in America: Sean Stewart

Brooklyn-based photographer Sean Stewart hails from the industrial city of Pittsburgh, PA. Stewart’s work is quiet and contemplative, and his subject matter is centered around contemporary American issues. His scenes depict everyday normalities: collapsed industry, identical prefabricated houses encroaching on sprawling plains, buses hastily pulling in and out of mall parking lots, and so on. But Stewart’s photographs are particularly arresting because they seem to be detached from the anxious mood these scenes elicit. They’re factual, clean, and seemingly objective, as if he is just hovering above them. We spoke with Sean about objectivity in photography, the decisive moment, and the importance of being part of a photographic community.
Read the interview
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rogerwilkerson:

Be as snug as a bug in a rug… detail from 1947 Rheem Home Heating ad.